Category Archives: NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo: Creating a book cover

nanowrimo-crestI was on the fence (again) this year about joining NaNoWriMo, but the idea of writing during the month of November with my amazing Platformed Challenged friends has convinced me. I’m in!

Still…

I worry.

This year, November for me means not only all of the usual busyness of Thanksgiving, family, and work because in addition there is a 100% chance of (FINALLY) moving into our new house. It’s been delayed and delayed and delayed, and we’ve been moving from temporary housing to temporary housing. But finally – in November – it will be done. And right smack in the middle of it all? NaNoWriMo.

So with these immense tasks looming large, I need all the motivation I can get. Little things can get me pumped when I’m feeling intimidated, so this morning instead of focusing on the writing, I thought I’d focus on something easier:

Creating a book cover for NaNoWriMo.

I have no plan when it comes to NaNo. I don’t plot – as much as I want to be the writer with the outline, character sketches, and full-blown plan for novel writing, I am a pantser through and through. In fact, I don’t have a clue as to what this year’s NaNo book will be about. Or at least I didn’t until I started making a cover. It’s one of my tricks up my very tricksy sleeves. I force myself to complete the first step, and the rest follows. Eventually. And if I change my mind or the Muses gift me with another story? I’ll change the cover. Easy as pie.

So for anyone who would like a nudge in the pants(er), here is a quick and painless way to create a NaNoWriMo book cover to display with pride (or any other emotion you choose) on your dashboard…

(1) Log in to Canva.

Canva is a free, online site that comes fully loaded with easy-to-use tools that make it possible for everyone (well, maybe not my mother but she still can’t figure out her email) to design graphics, presentations, social media bling, headers, buttons, and yes, NaNo book covers. For free. Just register with your email address and you’re good to go!

(2) From your Canva dashboard, click “Use custom dimensions” and enter 230 x 300 pixels. It will look something like this:

canva-step-2
You’ll then end up on the layout page with a blank slate, like this:

canva-step-2-and-a-half

(3) From here, you can get as creative as you’d like OR keep it as simple as you like.

Simple cover – For a crisp, clean cover, simply add a background color and lettering, like so:

canva-step-3

All I did here was select existing text from the left sidebar and edit it. For the author’s name, I used “Add a little bit of body text.” You can change the colors, size, etc., by simply selecting the element. Playing around and experimenting is the best way to find what you like.

Fancier cover – Or add photos (choose from free stock photos, pay $1 to use protected images, or upload your own photos), graphics, fancy fonts from your personal library, and other elements. Here’s an example using a free stock photo:

canva-step-3-and-a-half
I selected “Elements” from the left menu bar, picked “Free photos,” then entered “train” in the search box. To make the photo fit the cover, I dragged the corners until the image filled the 230 x 300 pixel template. Then I added text as above.

(4) After you’ve played around and are happy with the cover, click “Download” from the top menu bar and save the file as a JPG or PNG, the forms compatible with NaNo.

canva-step-4

(5) Finally, all that’s left is to visit your author dashboard over at NaNoWriMo and upload the cover!

I promise this is a very easy process and was actually faster than the time it took to write this post! I created my 2016 NaNoWriMo cover this morning after deciding to take the plunge. And while I didn’t know going in what my book would be about, the creative process got the juices flowing and an idea sparked. Now let’s hope it catches!

Are you participating in NaNoWriMo? Let me know if you create a NaNoWriMo cover! And if you have a different technique or use different software please feel free to share in the comment section – it’s always good to learn different ways to accomplish the same task since you never know what you’ll like best until you try it!

The Writing Life: Best Tips for Finishing NaNoWriMo

**Don’t forget to enter my Giveaway for your chance to win a copy of What If? Writing Exercises. Ends 11/24!**

finish lineThis is my first year taking on the month-long challenge that is NaNoWriMo. And so far, I’m pleasantly on track. Not ahead, not behind. Right on target. But every day, the words come more slowly. The looming mountain ahead feels higher and steeper than it did week one.

Bottom line? I’m starting to get worried about finishing.

So last night, I took a few hours and did what procrastinating writers everywhere do best – I surfed the web.  And read. And surfed. And read some more.  And I found some of the best tips for finishing NaNoWriMo on the web.

Because I want you to finish, I’m hoping my wasted writing hours will mean less procrastination for you. Take advantage of my surfing trip and check out these helpful articles and posts for finishing NaNoWriMo.

My personal favorite way to write when the well appears dry? NaNoWriMo Word Sprints on Twitter. I don’t know what it is, but just having that page up while writing motivates me to plow through and have something on the page before they yell, “STOP!”

Note: I’m only including five of the many, many, MANY articles I read because, well, the truth is you need to be writing and so do I!

When you’re through reading the wise words of these WriMo sages, get writing! The end is near – so write on!

TIPS FOR FINISHING NANOWRIMO
brought to you by World-Class Procrastinator, Kat McCormick… 

  1. From WritersDigest.comHalfway There: Finishing NaNoWriMo Strong by contributor Cris Freese

    This tidy article offers creative and inspiring tips from past finishers and writers to get you through the second half of NaNo.  My personal favorite? Bring wine!

  2. From WritabilityHow I Won NaNoWriMo in 9 Days by writer Ava Jae

    I know what you’re thinking… nine days?! You and I may not be aiming to pull off a 9-day feat (or if you’re behind maybe you are), but regardless of timing the tips and tricks used by speed writer Jae will help you power through toward the finish line.

  3. From Write It SidewaysHow to Get Past the NaNoWriMo Danger Point and Finish Your Novel by author and coach Hillary Rettig

    This article offers some tips I’ve read before, and some I haven’t – but they are presented in a different light that made something “click” in my brain. I especially like the tips about writing nonlinearly and examining your fears and pitfall (procrastination-busting at its best).

  4. From Kirsten Lamb’s Blog8 Elements to NAILING Your Plot & Owning NaNo by, you guessed it, Kirsten Lamb

    While this post is not specifically about finishing NaNo, Lamb points out flaw that will stop you from completing your story and provides insights on what is needed to avoid/fix them. I especially appreciate the section on the core story problem (or lack thereof).

  5. And last but not least, from CreativeLiveHow to Break Through Writer’s Block: Show Up & Bring a Pen by Hanna Brooks Olsen

    What I like best about this post is how straightforward it is – if you want to break through the shiny ribbon at the NaNo finish line, there is only one thing to do – WRITE! Olsen does offer some tips on how to write when the words don’t want to come, but overall this article was a swift kick in the rear for yours truly.

Any of these tips resonate with you? Or if you’re a past finisher, please share your best tip in the comments section and stop a WriMo procrastinator from spending more precious writing time surfing the web …  

To WriMo or Not to WriMo … That is the Question

nanowrimo no nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) begins November 1, and if you are a writer who reads any writing-related websites or blogs, or if you are a writer with an email/Twitter/FB/fill-in-the-blank account, or if you have a pulse chances are that your screen is starting to fill up with articles and tips and pleas to join thousands of other writers crank out tens of thousands of pages during NaNoWriMo.

I am a supporter of NaNoWriMo.  I’ve donated.  I petitioned our local library to host NaNoWriMo events.  I know other writers who have found success completing NaNoWriMo.  I even know teenagers who have done it for fun several years in a row.

And yet, I’ve never participated.

For me, NaNoWriMo comes at one of the busiest times of the year.  Up until this fall, when I enrolled my children in public school, I have always been a homeschooling mom.  And homeschooling four children takes a fair amount of time.  Combine that with some birthdays and Thanksgiving, family visits and the obligatory sightseeing, my part-time (nonwriting) work, LIFE … it has never been a good month for me to decide to spend hours trying to be creative.

And I can’t accept just writing – I want it to be good. I’ve always hesitated because how could I possible write anything “good” under such circumstances?

This year, my kids are in school … but so am I.  And my job is busier than ever.  And we have family visiting. And we’re moving. Into a house that is 3000 miles away and requires a whole-house remodel …. And the excuses are endless.  They will keep coming until the day I die, and even then I’ll probably use the excuse that I have to attend my own funeral.

I’m realizing that if I continue to use “I’m busy” as an excuse, I may never write anything.

So a question forms in my mind: Why NOT NaNoWriMo?

Sure, I’ll be swamped and pressed for time.  I already am. Sure, I might become frazzled and look like a crazy recluse.  I already do. Yes, I might not finish.  Big deal, I haven’t started it yet.  Yes, whatever I write might suck.  Well, the truth is it might but so what? Who will see it?  Besides, the worst writing is the blank page anyway…

In short, I have nothing to lose.

If I only complete half the pages, I will still be ahead of where I am today. And I will have begun.  Perhaps by joining at one of the busiest times of my life and participating to the fullest extent possible for me, I can grow as a writer and as a person.

I’m still undecided.

What do you think? Do you WriMo or No WriMo?